4 Talladegans busted in meth sting
by CHRIS NORWOOD
Oct 09, 2009 | 6804 views |  26 comments | 32 32 recommendations | email to a friend | print
The Talladega County Drug and Violent Crime Task Force seized these precursor materials, along with about five grams of finished product, at a clandestine lab in a shop on Pope Street in Talladega. Four people were arrested at the Budget Inn in connection with this particular lab Wednesday night.
The Talladega County Drug and Violent Crime Task Force seized these precursor materials, along with about five grams of finished product, at a clandestine lab in a shop on Pope Street in Talladega. Four people were arrested at the Budget Inn in connection with this particular lab Wednesday night.
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TALLADEGA — A “reverse sting” operation conducted Wednesday night by the Talladega County Drug and Violent Crime Task Force resulted in four people being arrested on felony drug charges.

According to a press release issued Friday by task force commander Jason Murray, the suspects were Jason Gooden, 29; his wife, Tasha Gooden, 28; Roger Johnson, 37; and Nathaniel Manor, 22, all of Talladega. The Goodens had been living at the Budget Inn Motel with their two children (ages 7 and 9 months) for about the past four weeks, Murray said.

Jason Gooden, Johnson and Manor were each charged with unlawful manufacture of a controlled substance in the second degree. Each of their bonds was set at $25,000 by District Judge Jeb Fannin. Tasha Gooden was charged with unlawful possession of a controlled substance (methamphetamine) and given a $5,000 bond, also by Fannin.

The children were released into the custody of Gooden’s parents, Murray said.

Wednesday night, task force agents delivered cold medicine to the four suspects at the motel, with the understanding that it would be used to make methamphetamine.

After the four suspects were in custody, officers went to the shop where Jason Gooden works and found an active methamphetamine lab.

Altogether about five grams of finished product was recovered.

Murray said it was possible for a grand jury to consider more serious charges.

Manufacture of a controlled substance in the second degree is a Class B felony, punishable upon conviction by two to 20 years in prison.

Possession of a controlled substance is a Class C felony, punishable by one year and one day to 10 years in prison.