MHS teacher says farewell after being called to duty
by Aziza Jackson
Feb 11, 2011 | 3269 views |  1 comments | 12 12 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Munford High School faculty members threw a surprise going away reception Friday morning for special education teacher Lee Romines, who will be deployed to Iraq in a few months. Bob Crisp/The Daily Home
Munford High School faculty members threw a surprise going away reception Friday morning for special education teacher Lee Romines, who will be deployed to Iraq in a few months. Bob Crisp/The Daily Home
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MUNFORD — Lee Romines, Munford High School special education teacher, was surprised by his fellow faculty members with a goodbye ceremony Friday morning, his last day of work before being deployed to Iraq.

Romines is in the Alabama Army National Guard.

He will be in Iraq for a year, and will be leaving in a few months to join his unit.

“I’m looking forward to it. I definitely think we have a reason to be over there,” Romines said.

He said he had a lot of work to do Friday, most of which required breaking in the substitute who will teach his special education classes while he is gone.

“I’m trying to get everything transitioned to my substitute and bring him up to speed on things going on,” he said.

Romines has been in the National Guard 23 years and has been teaching at MHS about five years.

“This is my second deployment, but my wife’s first,” he said.

Romines’ first deployment was in 2002 to Afghanistan.

He said his wife, 2-year-old daughter Hannah, 4-year-old daughter Ashlee, and 19-year-old daughter Katelynn will have a close-knit support system while he is gone.

“She’s (his wife) taking it pretty well,” Romines said. “We have her family close by, and my family close by.”

In addition to family, Romines said the National Guard has a support system for families of all soldiers who are deployed.

Romines’ class was busy Friday with visitors coming to say their goodbyes to their teacher.

“My students, even students that I’m not even directly involved with, come by and wish me well,” Romines said.

He said he will miss his students and plans to return to MHS to teach when he gets back home.