Rescue Squad officers swap seats
by Bill Kimber
Dec 11, 2013 | 834 views |  0 comments | 11 11 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Bill Kimber/The Daily Home
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Tim Butler, left, is the new captain of the Childersburg Rescue Squad. Kenneth Young, who has served as captain for 21 years, will be the first lieutenant.
Bill Kimber/The Daily Home

Tim Butler, left, is the new captain of the Childersburg Rescue Squad. Kenneth Young, who has served as captain for 21 years, will be the first lieutenant.
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CHILDERSBURG – When city or county authorities in the Childersburg area need search and rescue or water rescue support, they call on the Childersburg Rescue Squad. And for the past 21 years, the squad has called on Kenneth Young for leadership.

Not anymore.

Young will continue his service in the squad, and will even serve as the first lieutenant. But after more than two decades at the helm, he will no longer serve as captain.

“We’re both retired now and we don’t want to be tied down,” Young said, explaining that his wife Martha is also a member of the squad.

Young retired from Resolute Forest Products last April, having started work at the paper mill in 1977, when it was owned by Kimberly-Clark.

Young joined the Rescue Squad in 1988 and was voted in as second lieutenant in 1991. After Capt. Albert Webber died in the summer of 1992, Young was elected captain in December of that year, and he has served in the post ever since.

His wife joined in 1989 and has served as secretary and treasurer. She is a retired child nutrition worker from the Talladega County school system, having worked at Childersburg High, Winterboro High and Childersburg Elementary schools.

Their sons are both involved as well, joining their parents for monthly meetings and periodic training when they were kids. Brian Young, a teacher in Winterboro, serves as the squad’s chaplain, and Jason Young, an employee of Honda, is the public relations officer.

“We’ve had some good years,” Young said. “I remember during the winter storm of 1993, we made 212 calls. Of those, 85 were life-support calls.”

The squad transported generators to people on life-support machines at home, transported nurses and patients to and from hospitals and doctors’ offices, and transported oxygen bottles and medicine to people who could not travel because of the snow and ice.

“It’s all voluntary. There’s no paid service here,” Young said.

As Young steps down as captain, he will be replaced by Tim Butler, who has served as first lieutenant.

“The reason I enjoy doing this is, if it was my child out there who needed to be rescued, I would want somebody doing it,” Butler said. “We all have our specialties and different training, and we all work together to achieve the same goal.”