Mouth-watering, delicious venison
Feb 03, 2014 | 4240 views |  0 comments | 45 45 recommendations | email to a friend | print
<br>
Photos by Bob Crisp/The Daily Home
<br>
<br>
Venison Summer Sausage

Photos by Bob Crisp/The Daily Home

Venison Summer Sausage
slideshow
Venison Cube Steak
Venison Cube Steak
slideshow
Venison Chili
Venison Chili
slideshow
Cajun Cornbread
Cajun Cornbread
slideshow
I was introduced to venison this week that had been properly dressed and packaged and prepared in a very delicious way!

My granddaughter has a friend who had been successful on a hunt and shared his bounty with us. Emily found recipes, prepared the meat and we had a feast! The processors of this venison were Pa Pa Jim’s and Jerry Cox on Lake Joy, near Sylacauga. I have to tell you, I was skeptical. I had never really given myself a chance to taste and savor the flavor of wild deer. For some reason I was convinced it wasn’t going to be good, even before I bit into it. But I learned something. If deer meat is processed and prepared properly, it is “mouth-watering delicious!”

One of the first things Emily cooked was Venison Chili. One good whiff of that pot cooking on the stove was enough to change any skeptic’s mind!

Along with the Venison Chili, she made some Mexican Cornbread that was just a perfect “go together” for the chili.

We had venison cubed steak later and it was wonderful. Emily soaked the meat overnight in enough salt water to cover. The following day, she drained and rinsed it, patted it dry and put pepper and salt on it. Afterwards, she gave the meat an egg wash, then she dredged it in flour. It was cooked in hot oil, on medium heat until the coating was crispy.

We’ve enjoyed snacking on venison summer sausage, (made by Pa Pa Jim), with wedges of cheese and crackers, and we still have venison tenderloins, wrapped in bacon to look forward to. Emily says we must wait until the weather permits us to cook on the grill for that.

I’ve been doing some reading on venison since I realized how delicious it really is. According to Wikipedia, venison (compared to beef and lamb), is higher in moisture, similar in protein, lower in cholesterol and has much less fat.



Venison Chili


2 lb. ground venison

1 medium onion

1 yellow pepper

1 green pepper

2 cans Rotel tomatoes, (chili style and not drained)

1 can dark, red kidney beans, (not drained)

44 oz. tomato sauce (1 big can and 1 regular can)

1 can chili beans, (not drained)

2 T. chili powder

1 T. cumin

1 t. salt

½ t. ground red pepper

Dash cinnamon

2 T. sugar

1 bay leaf

1 t. paprika




Brown venison in stock pot. Add onion and pepper and simmer until slightly tender. Add the rest of the ingredients. Cover and simmer on low heat for approximately 2 hours. Serve with sour cream and shredded cheese.



Cajun Cornbread


2 cups self-rising cornmeal

2 eggs, beaten

¼ c. vegetable oil

¾ c. buttermilk

1 can creamed corn

½ c. chopped jalapeno peppers

1 c. shredded cheddar cheese

½ t. ground, red pepper




Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Mix all ingredients together until well blended. Coat the bottom of a cast iron skillet with vegetable oil. Heat on top of stove until oil is hot. Pour cornbread mixture into skillet. Place skillet in oven and baked until golden brown, approximately 35-45 minutes.