LES kids raise funds for animals
by Shane Dunaway
Feb 09, 2014 | 2210 views |  0 comments | 28 28 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Shane Dunaway/The Daily Home
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Pell City Animal Shelter Clinical Attendant Cindy Roberts receives a $153 donation from Lincoln Elementary School Second Grade Teacher Cindy Graham while second-grader Payden Hopson holds “Split,” a four-month old Labrador mix puppy, during a fundraiser held Friday in the school’s cafeteria. Teachers encouraged more than 100 second-graders to bring in 101 coins of any denomination to help benefit the shelter.
Shane Dunaway/The Daily Home

Pell City Animal Shelter Clinical Attendant Cindy Roberts receives a $153 donation from Lincoln Elementary School Second Grade Teacher Cindy Graham while second-grader Payden Hopson holds “Split,” a four-month old Labrador mix puppy, during a fundraiser held Friday in the school’s cafeteria. Teachers encouraged more than 100 second-graders to bring in 101 coins of any denomination to help benefit the shelter.
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More than 100 Lincoln Elementary School second-graders dressed as Dalmatians gathered in the school’s cafeteria Friday afternoon to meet “Split,” a four-month old Labrador mix puppy.

Split, handled by Clinical Attendant for the Pell City Animal Shelter Cindy Roberts, will be one of many sheltered animals to benefit from the more than $153 in change collected by the students in fundraiser organized by LES Teacher Christine Taylor.

The event, originally scheduled to be held Jan. 29 in conjunction with the 101st day of the school year, was cancelled due to the snowstorm and rescheduled for Friday.

According to Second Grade Teacher Cindy Graham, second-grade teachers encouraged their students to bring in 101 coins of any denomination as a donation for the shelter.

Roberts addressed the students, explaining her role at the shelter while she carried Split around the room to meet them.

“My job at the animal shelter is like the school nurse,” Roberts said. “I make sure all the animals are healthy, and have all their shots and all their medicine. Then, we get them ready to find a home.”

As she spoke, smatterings of “ooohs,” “ahhhs” and “awwws” peppered the air in the cafeteria as each child appeared to be enamored with the black and white pup.

One student exclaimed he would buy the dog for $2,000 before another student chimed in over him, “I’ll pay you $5,000!”

Roberts explained the process for adopting an animal after a student asked how much it would cost.

“It’s expensive to adopt a pet,” Roberts said. “It costs $125. That’s a lot of money. The animals have to have surgeries, shots, rabies vaccinations and microchips in case they get lost. That’s very important. We try to find them all a home. Sometimes, we get a foster home for them if we can’t find someone to adopt them and some of us end up taking them home, too.”

After nearly 10 minutes of answering questions for the students, Roberts received the donation from the students presented by Graham.

Following the presentation, each classroom dismissed from the classroom, but not before each student had an opportunity to pet Split.

Roberts said she came away impressed with the children’s efforts in ensuring every dog, or cat for that matter, has its day.

“That’s money we didn’t have five minutes ago,” Roberts said. “All of our money comes from these donations, so if you put one dollar with one dollar, pretty soon we’ll have enough money to take care of our needs and sometimes our wants as well. It is amazing when we can the kids involved and they can start helping out at an early age. Most likely, the money will go towards cleaning supplies because we use those the most everyday. That’ll probably help buy some bleach, some sanitizer and maybe some blankets because we’re still in the middle of winter.”

Contact Shane Dunaway at sdunaway@dailyhome.com